Tag Archives: hearts for hearts

More cute Wellie stuff!

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A HUGE thank you to everyone that shared their pix, and if you don’t have a Wellie, you can now get the pattern for the jammies here.  Yes, they fit H4H; the top is a wee bit baggy although for PJs that shouldn’t matter much!  The top would make a nice blouse too; the collar gives it a sweet, vintage feel in my opinion.  How about a feedsack print with a white collar?

Speaking of H4H and things they can share, the princess collection for them is ready so you can keep adding to their dress up box: 
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And the beautifully fitted “Versatility” pants/capris/shorts with working (or not) pockets that have been available for AG and Maru are now in Wellie/H4H size:

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In case you’re wondering…no, these dolls are not exactly the same size.  But when you overlap the closures in back to accommodate the slightly (1/2″) thinner torso of the H4H, they can share many patterns.  I’m thinking I may do more for them, especially because  Joanne commented and linked to FB saying the H4H are coming back! Supposedly in time for the 2016 holiday season – hooray!

Back to school stuff

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YAY!  Time for awesome new back to school crafts including more shrinkies, printies AND a sewing pattern!

(scroll to the bottom to download)

If you are reading this blog, stop for a minute and consider how lucky you are.  It’s more than likely that you’re a girl, and yet you still had enough education to learn how to read.  That education enabled you to reach a high enough economic level that you are able to afford a computer, and you live somewhere that Internet access is readily available.  If you live in the developed world, the only barrier to you receiving the same education as the boys in your country was being able to get to school on time, which probably involved nothing more difficult than making it to the bus stop or walking a mile or so.

There’s a documentary on Netflix called “On the way to school” that brings to light the challenges children in developing countries encounter every day just to arrive at school safely.  It might be interesting to watch with your kids if they complain about their journey to school.  I’m pretty sure they didn’t have to worry about being chased by wild animals or pushing their brother’s broken-down wheelchair through the mud!

Another documentary called “Half the Sky”, which is also a book if you’d prefer to read instead, illustrates how girls in developing countries are facing horrible obstacles just to get primary education.  Note that this documentary is NOT suitable to watch with children and might make you cry.  Both of these documentaries made me very, very grateful to have grown up where I did, with easy access to education!

The two newest H4H dolls have stories that expose the harsh realities real children around the world are facing:
(images below from the H4H facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/HeartsForHeartsGirls)  Unfortunately, their page hasn’t been updated for almost a year, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed these gorgeous dolls will stay available!

Ok, so you have a H4H and want her to go to school?  She’ll need a uniform:

Click here to get a pattern to make a H4H size uniform, and school supplies and printable books for any size.

The fit of this is loose on H4H.  For a tighter fit, use a larger seam allowance at the side seams and make your skirt pleats deeper.  Need it for a different doll?  As a very rough guide, try 138% for Sasha/Kidz and 156% for AGs.  If you’re enlarging, you will probably also need to adjust sleeve width, lengths of the blouse and at the bottom of skirt and adjust outer seam allowances for collar.  To gauge how it might fit, compare your enlargement to a shirt with a similar pattern that you know will fit, such as this one: https://jenwrenne.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/summer-sew-along-2013-part-2-t-and-capris.pdf   Please make a muslin in scrap fabric/paper towels before cutting into good fabric.

Note to people who say shrinky dinks aren’t available where they live…they are just #6 plastic!  Probably you have some in your recycle bin right now!  You can recycle old containers made of rigid plastic with a #6 recycling logo.

 

French Fashion Dolls Week 3

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Apologies for not doing a good job moderating comments and responding to emails.  I AM reading them but since being back at work don’t really have the energy to do both and have to prioritize.

LOTS of people responded to the survey and I was going to summarize it this week but realized I hadn’t given you a deadline…so thank you if you have done it, and if you haven’t but still want to, please click here to do it today!  I’ll close it on Friday and have the results for you next week.

It may be hot where you are, but this week we have lots of winter fun.  There’s a toque and muff for keeping warm while you ice skate, as well as some pastimes to do by the fire, like knitting and dominoes.  Enjoy!

Get week 3 here

Next week is the end of the French Fashion series and I definitely saved the best shoes and paper craft for last! After that there will be a post on back to school goodies with an emphasis on H4H!

 

French Fashion Dolls Week 2

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Thank you for all the comments!

As a reminder, patterns for dresses to accompany these accessories and help make a full trousseau can be found here

Get week 2 free patterns here

Last summer I did a survey and it really helped guide what I posted.  Since the number of followers keeps growing and I’d like to stay on track and keep posting fun and useful stuff, it’s time to tell me again!

Take the survey here.  

It’s just 9 questions and lets you help decide what appears on this blog!  

As a reminder you can always post comments or email me with suggestions too!

Before you suggest it…yes, I’m already working on a 1950s collection for the upcoming AG, Maryellen, and a 1960s collection for the upcoming Girl for all Time, Sam.

Le trousseau de ma poupée

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What I started last summer and never got a chance to share with you:

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(click to enlarge)

This book came out a few years ago.  It was $75.  Since I don’t have a French fashion doll, I was obviously reluctant to plunk down that kind of cash for the book, even though I was sure it would be pretty great.  Then I found it on Amazon for a better price, and asked my husband if I could/should get it.  Knowing me as well as he does, he thought it would probably not be a good idea, as the logical outcome of this would be me begging for a French fashion doll.  Antique French fashion dolls with a complete trousseau can go for $10,000 and up at auctions, and modern reproductions cost about as much as a really nice BJD, which is probably more than I should be spending on a doll with such limited costuming possibilities.

(image from Thierault’s via pinterest)

So, I promised not to ask for a French fashion doll, and ordered the book.  It has patterns for two sizes of dolls in it, but unfortunately, there are no measurements of the dolls these patterns were drafted on.  Looking at the photos in the book, although these dolls were meant to represent adult women of the time, they have quite small busts and a larger waist than you would expect from a corseted era.   I tried a few of the 12” muslins I had made on a variety of dolls, and the closest fit was my Corolle Cherie, but it was still a little tight.  So I enlarged it at 110%.  Now it fit Hearts for Hearts with some minor adjustments!  “Fast and easy” are great words when it comes to sewing, but sometimes your sewing soul needs “intricate and complicated” to really feel a sense of accomplishment, and these dresses definitely make you proud when they’re finished!

French fashion dolls had their heyday around the 1850s-60s.  It’s tempting to compare them to Barbie or AG, as they had similarly enormous wardrobes and lots of accessories, but these were dolls for very privileged little girls.  Their clothing consisted of exquisite hand-made dresses for every conceivable occasion just like their mothers were wearing, in the finest of fabrics.  Their accessories were often of very costly materials, like ivory and even precious metals and gems for their jewelry!

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I decided it would be fun to create my own trousseau for my Hearts for Hearts, but coincidentally, while I was working on it, AG retired Cecile and Marie Grace!  I was heartbroken, as Cecile is one of my all-time favorite AGs, but bought some furniture and accessories, and then decided Cecile could share in the fun.  You can too!  This week we’ll start a 4-week sew- and craft-along.  Each week has different projects using a variety of crafting techniques.  There are sewing projects, paper crafts, shoemaking, tons of things made from modern-day elephant-safe “ivory” (AKA shrinky dinks), as well as hats and other random items.  They were made for H4H, but most items can be easily resized for bigger dolls.

To go along with all these accessories, there are some new historical dress patterns  that include my version of two of my favorite AG dresses from that era, sized for H4H and AG dolls, and one based on a very popular style shown frequently in antique doll trousseaux. Want to get a few patterns?  Use coupon code 20OFF20 to get 20% off any order of $20 or more in my etsy shop through Sunday! 

Go find a really fabulous box to use as a trunk, and get ready to re-create history!

Get week 1 free patterns here

BTW:  This set (maybe with a new doll?) would make an amazing gift for your special little girl!  Make it now and put it away for the next birthday/holiday.

Don’t like historical stuff?

I put together lots of AG inspiration and pattern links to sew modern clothes here

It will surely keep you busy until we finish the French Fashion series!  🙂

 

 

Sigue lloviendo…

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This photo is from our canyon’s FB page and illustrates what the weather’s been like lately…it just keeps raining!  But if you live in an area this dry and you get your water from a well, you’re not likely to complain too much about precipitation.

So the post I WAS planning got moved to next week in the hopes I’ll have a sunny day to photograph that outfit, and this week’s post turned into something the dolls desperately needed:  A raincoat!

Pictured above is Paola Reina Liu – more about her next week!

It’s really hard to take good pictures in rain and mist, both for reasons of lighting and because you’re feeling rushed and cold/lying the mud/worrying that your camera is getting rained on.  It can also be hard to take good photos of shiny things with their “trying highlights” (anyone get that reference?) and those two things combined today to make for not-the-best-photos ever.

This was the one I liked the best, although if you blow it up enough you can see my reflection in her eyes as I stood over her with the camera! 🙂

Get the free raincoat pattern to fit Cheries and Paola Reina Amigas here

You can see in the photo below that the PRs are noticeably smaller than H4H.

Copy the raincoat pattern at 107% to fit H4H!

(L-R) 10″ Tonner Half-Pint (AE body), 12″ Paola Reina, 14″ Hearts for Hearts, 13″ Corolle Cheries, 12″ Natterer Minouche

Little Darling in Japan: week 6

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Apologies for unanswered comments/emails form last week!

Also, an etsy note: I’m now going to be re-downloading and checking patterns as soon as they’re listed, because something seems to be happening from time to time that pattern pieces mysteriously change shape.  So far that has happened with the arctic parka, a sleeve from the 1940s collection and the Maru “versatility” pants.  SORRY!! If you have those patterns you should have gotten an email about it with pieces that will print correctly.  If not, please let me know and I’m happy to resend!  If ever a pattern piece doesn’t look right, please let me know and I will make it right!

Ok, on to this week’s post:

So I had kind of a revelation last week about gathers and pleats and fullness in general in historical Asian garments. You know about the pleats in week 3’s hakama, and this week we have a pleated skirt-type hakama to wear over a summer kimono (yukata) as Little Darling celebrates Obon.  (Apparently she’s time traveling too, back to summer!)

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And then I started thinking about Chinese clothing, for example, the unusual skirt made in two pieces and attached with little frogs (see it here)

Even in Southeast Asia, garments were more often pleated, for example, sarong-style skirts and saris.
Korea seemed to be an exception, with the women wearing wide, full skirts. I had always assumed they were gathered, but the other day I was watching a historical K-drama where they did a close-up of a dress after she flung it over a dressing screen. Turns out, it was pleated with many tiny pleats!

So, I asked myself…why no gathers? In my opinion, gathers are easier to do than pleats. OOOH, unless you’re sewing by hand. (that was the revelation)  Pleated garments can also be folded and stored more easily to avoid wrinkles, especially in drawers and chests, which was the common storage method in most parts of Asia. There’s a bit more polished elegance to pleats as compared to gathers, and finally, these loose-fitting pleated garments were very easy to adapt to different wearers or body changes. Remember when Scarlett O’Hara had to get out the seam ripper to alter a dress before a party because her waist had increased by a couple of inches? That would never have happened with most garments being worn in Asia in that same time period!

Pattern for this week’s outfit  is here

Also, here is a printable shoji-style lamp.  You can use it as a room decoration or to help your doll celebrate Obon.  Print it as “shrink to fit” on cardstock, fold and glue.

If you like pleats and want something more Western, there are TWO new patterns for 13″-14″ dolls in my etsy shop.

The first one was done as a custom request based on a family photo and named for its original wearer.  It features a unique asymmetric front bodice with a pleated skirt and closes down the back. The pattern includes some vintage illustrations and hints about “period correct” fabric and color choices.The other was based on a dress from the Fall/Winter Sears catalog from 1966. I named it the “Alpine Dress” because the embroidery and front band reminded me of Lederhosen. 🙂  Embroidery can be stitched by hand or is available in .pes format.