Make a kimono with “fake” lining

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Have you heard the term “grail” doll?  Mamachapp Moko-chan, specifically this pigtail one, was one of my grail dolls and eventually did arrive and then got hidden to be a present for some special occasion. I found her while cleaning the doll room because DH is apparently not a good hider of dolls 😉  He is good at taking pix of them though, as you can see from Moko-chan’s first photo shoot: https://www.flickr.com/photos/67465307@N08/albums/72157697316555690 

I recently got another version of Moko-chan, who came in a kimono.  You might recall from some previous posts the difference between kimono and yukata, but to avoid linking here, I’ll mention one main difference, which is lining.

Many tiny doll clothes sell for exorbitant prices, and Azone/Obitsu are some of the higher-end ones of these. You can get this 21cm Obitsu body for around $20, and maybe another $20for a head with rooted hair, so what you’re really paying the high price for with the Mamachapps is basically the eyes, styling of hair, and clothing.  The pictures of this doll in her promotional photos made it look like she was wearing a lined kimono, so I was startled to take it off and find out that it was not only unlined, but the seams weren’t even finished on the inside!  I did love the effect of the fake “lining” though, for a couple of reasons.  First, it’s definitely easier and takes less fabric than lining the whole garment, and secondly, it avoids the dreaded“bulk” I’m always going on about with doll clothes.  Something I found very interesting though,and wouldn’t have come up with on my own is using fabric on the BIAS for this purpose.  This is a great idea that really improves the drape of the pieces, especially the lining for the body itself, helping it to curve nicely around the body rather than sticking out stiffly.  Fabrics cut on the bias don’t fray the same way as those cut on the straight grain, so I can even before giving of the sleeve “lining,” although I still would have preferred it to be at least pinked.   

Of course, I needed to make a kimono for my original Moko-chan too, so the pattern here is based on the one her sister came with.  It fits an Obitsu 21-23cm body or anyone else with similar measurements such as Dal, Tiny Betsy (shorten arms and bottom hem), or even Licca and Blythe bodies. Don’t have any of those?  The tutorial for fake lining can be used with any yukata/kimono pattern on the blog but is probably most useful for the small doll ones like Ten Ping or Little Darling. 

Get the tutorial here

There are more kimono patterns to use with this “lining” technique here:

https://jenwrenne.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/free-pattern-for-february-kimono-geta-obi.pdf (this fits AGAT and Kidz n Cats)

https://jenwrenne.wordpress.com/2015/07/15/more-ten-ping/

https://jenwrenne.wordpress.com/?s=little+darling+in+japan

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