Monthly Archives: March 2016

Salon style…at home!

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While you could take your doll (yes, even your OG!) to the AG store and pay an exorbitant price for a fancy hairdo at the salon, it’s faster and cheaper to do it at home.  After a few requests and comments on April’s hair, here is a

crown braid tutorial

If you read her journal last week, you know both April and Abril are having a birthday this Friday, so look for a new birthday dress pattern, and maybe some other goodies next week!  If you’re wondering, April is hoping her dress will look kind of like this:

 and I’ve got the pattern ready but am still trying to find some lace that would be appropriate.  Keep your fingers crossed!

(above dress by AG is available here: http://www.americangirl.com/shop/new/spring-breeze-dress-set-for-dolls-dhv57)

 

Happy Spring!

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I know…your dolls wanted some new spring clothes, right?  Well, apparently spring here means two feet of snow and two days without internet access, so I’m posting something more appropriate for that:

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Get April’s puffy vest pattern free here

Wear it over a long sleeved T and leggings from the SSA last year or here

The vest looks great over this top too:

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Yep, there’s finally a new pattern available on etsy for a plaid flannel tunic with a real front placket.  Until about the 1930s, men’s shirts pulled over the head, instead of buttoning all the way up the front like they do today.  The front was cut from a single piece of fabric, slashed at the neck, then finished with a placket.  This type of opening is still common on sport shirts like polos, and lately has become really trendy for women’s and girls’ flannel and denim blouses.  Knowing how to add make these plackets is a good skill to have in your sewing toolbox, and what better way to practice a new skill than on doll clothes?

It has one size to fit both dolls.  Originally, I made it to be a tight fit on April, then re-sized in my standard way for Knc.  I wasn’t thrilled with the fit, since the new bodies have a larger chest and the placket had to gape open.  When I tried the AG size on her, it actually looked fine, especially when belted.  That inspired me to do a comparison of the new and old Knc bodies: https://www.dropbox.com/s/5ygylg46bb2oue8/knc%20comparison.pdf?dl=0

 

A new edition of April’s journal is here

Since the majority of you didn’t want secret links to projects in her journal you can get

her verbnitsa doll pattern here.

It’s a doll commonly made in Russia for Palm Sunday or during the Easter season.  Paste this into your browser’s search window: Вербница (try using chrome with translate turned on if you don’t speak Russian) to see more examples of this kind of doll.  Yes, I know that Eastern Orthodox Easter is not until May 1 this year, but maybe your dolls need one for this weekend…:)

I was hoping to have the new Ten Ping patterns ready for this week; they’re not quite there yet, but here’s a sneak peek at some of the muslins…

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They’re taking a little longer because they will have two sizes for 8″ BJDs and 10″ Tonner AE/Patsy!

 

 

 

The kids are here!

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Since April’s family raises goats, it seemed important that she have a few as photo props.  You’d think it would be an easy matter to just find/buy a pattern, but most stuffed goat patterns I could find had bodies more similar to horses.  This challenged me to make my first foray into the world of stuffed-animal design and come up with what I think is a fairly authentic looking one.

I wasn’t sure when to post this, since people breed their goats to kid at different times, but passing a cow pasture on the way to work a few days ago I noticed a new baby had been born!  It must have happened very recently, because the calf was still wobbling around on unsteady legs, so it seemed appropriate for April’s goats to start kidding (having their babies) this week too!

Although it’s intended to be a baby goat, you could also make it with fluffier fur to be a lamb and there’s still enough time to get it made for an Easter display or to tuck into a basket!  If you, like me, are not accustomed to making stuffed animals, you might be intimidated and feel it’s too difficult or time-consuming.  Just TRY IT!  I anticipated a long and difficult project and was happily surprised to see how quick it was to make and how cute it looks when posed with dolls.

Click here for the kid/lamb pattern